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Everything We Know About the Army’s Uncanny Chatbots

Everything We Know About the Army's Uncanny Chatbots

Sgt. Star is the U.S. Army’s dedicated marketing and recruitment chatbot, and he isn’t going to turn whistleblower any time soon. There’s no use threatening him for answers either—he’s programmed to report that kind of hostility to the Army Criminal Investigation Division.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/f-OXpiX4Ukg/everything-we-know-about-the-armys-uncanny-chatbots-1564766836
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Tor’s anonymity network may have to shrink to fight the Heartbleed bug

Bad news if you’re relying on the Tor network to evade surveillance or otherwise remain anonymous: you’re not immune from the Heartbleed bug, either. Key developer Roger Dingledine warns that some Tor nodes are running encryption software that’s…

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/L6zEhSushHM/
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This is what America’s most famous pit–the Grand Canyon–looks like from the International Space St

This is what America’s most famous pit—the Grand Canyon—looks like from the International Space Station. A winding craggy oasis in the middle of the desert. [NASA]

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Watch the Navy parachute team jump and land inside a baseball stadium

Watch the Navy parachute team jump and land inside a baseball stadium

Because most of us will never take the literal leap of jumping off a damn plane, here’s POV footage from the Leap Frogs aka the Navy’s parachute team. For the San Diego Padre’s home opener, the jumpers took off in a plane and landed right smack inside Petco Park. You can hear the roar of the crowd grow louder as they get closer.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/lpAk1da9QAQ/+caseychan
Category: Wisconsin Basketball   Seth Rogen   2018 Winter Olympics   Dunk Contest 2014   Gal Gadot  

Bella Thorne Gets into Character for Project Mermaids

Heading out for some relaxation, Bella Thorne stopped by Southern California beach on Monday (November 5).

While enjoying some laughs and fun in the sun with her sisters Dani and Kaili, the 16-year-old Disney star took to her Instagram with out-of-this-world snapshots.

“@projectmermaids #saveourbeach,” Bella captioned the pic that featured her and her siblings donning mermaid tails and shell-embellished bikini tops.

Miss Thorne also showed off another photo of herself looking away from the sunshine and waves. “Sometimes you lose beautiful things #saveourbeach” she wrote.

The photos by the Project Mermaid photographers Angelina Verturella and Chiara Salomoni assist the nonprofit organization Save Our Beaches.

Per its mission statement, Save Our Beaches helps “to educate individuals, companies, schools & organizations on how their environmental footprint impacts their community and the world by participating in Save Our Beach environmental field trips, beach & riverbed cleanups and team building activities.”

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/bella-thorne/bella-thorne-gets-character-project-mermaids-956195
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The Weirdest Thing on the Internet Tonight: Imtra

For something that starts off like a bad acid trip, this indescribable animated short by bestbefore certainly finishes like a bad acid trip. So yeah, bad acid trip pretty much all the way through. It is quite beautiful, however, and even rather hypnotic after a while. But what does it mean?

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Russian fireball shows meteor risk may be bigger

In this frame grab made from dashboard camera vide shows a meteor streaking through the sky over Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow, Friday, Feb. 15, 2013. After a surprise meteor hit Earth at 42,000 mph and exploded over a Russian city in February, smashing windows and causing minor injuries, scientists studying the aftermath say the threat of space rocks hurtling toward our planet is bigger than they had thought. Meteors like the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk _ and those that are even bigger and more dangerous _ are probably four to five times more likely to hit Earth than scientists thought before the February mid-air explosion, according to three studies released Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science. (AP Photo/AP Video)

In this frame grab made from dashboard camera vide shows a meteor streaking through the sky over Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow, Friday, Feb. 15, 2013. After a surprise meteor hit Earth at 42,000 mph and exploded over a Russian city in February, smashing windows and causing minor injuries, scientists studying the aftermath say the threat of space rocks hurtling toward our planet is bigger than they had thought. Meteors like the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk _ and those that are even bigger and more dangerous _ are probably four to five times more likely to hit Earth than scientists thought before the February mid-air explosion, according to three studies released Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science. (AP Photo/AP Video)

Maps show how scientists will narrow the field of impact in the weeks approaching the time of impact.; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;

This photo provided by The Field Museum in Chicago, taken April 9, 2013, shows pieces of a meteor that exploded over Russia’s Ural Mountains in February after they were catalogued on their arrival at the Chicago museum. The museum received nearly two pounds of small meteorite pieces donated by a collector. After a surprise meteor hit Earth at 42,000 mph and exploded over a Russian city in February, smashing windows and causing minor injuries, scientists studying the aftermath say the threat of space rocks hurtling toward our planet is bigger than they had thought. Meteors like the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk _ and those that are even bigger and more dangerous _ are probably four to five times more likely to hit Earth than scientists thought before the February mid-air explosion, according to three studies released Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science. (AP Photo/Courtesy of The Field Museum, Karen Bean, File)

FILE – In this Feb. 15, 2013 file photo provided by Chelyabinsk.ru, shows a meteorite contrail over the Ural Mountains’ city of Chelyabinsk, about 930 miles east of Moscow, Russia. After a surprise meteor hit Earth at 42,000 mph and exploded over a Russian city in February, smashing windows and causing minor injuries, scientists studying the aftermath say the threat of space rocks hurtling toward our planet is bigger than they had thought. Meteors like the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk _ and those that are even bigger and more dangerous _ are probably four to five times more likely to hit Earth than scientists thought before the February mid-air explosion, according to three studies released Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science. (AP Photo/Chelyabinsk.ru, Yekaterina Pustynnikova, File)

(AP) — Scientists studying the terrifying meteor that exploded without warning over a Russian city last winter say the threat of space rocks smashing into Earth is bigger than they thought.

Meteors about the size of the one that streaked through the sky at 42,000 mph and burst over Chelyabinsk in February — and ones even larger and more dangerous — are probably four, five or even seven times more likely to hit the planet than scientists believed before the fireball, according to three studies published Wednesday in the journals Nature and Science.

That means about 20 million space rocks the size of the Chelyabinsk one may be zipping around the solar system, instead of 3 million, NASA scientist Paul Chodas said at a news conference.

Until Chelyabinsk, NASA had looked only for space rocks about 100 feet wide and bigger, figuring there was little danger below that.

This meteor was only 62 feet across but burst with the force of 40 Hiroshima-type atom bombs, scientists say. Its shock wave shattered thousands of windows, and its flash temporarily blinded 70 people and caused dozens of skin-peeling sunburns just after dawn in icy Russia. More than 1,600 people in all were injured.

Up until then, scientists had figured a meteor causing an airburst like that was a once-in-150-years event, based on how many space rocks have been identified in orbit. But one of the studies now says it is likely to happen once every 30 years or so, based on how often these things are actually hitting.

By readjusting how often these rocks strike and how damaging even small ones can be, “those two things together can increase the risk by an order of magnitude,” said Mark Boslough, a Sandia National Lab physicist, co-author of one of the studies.

Lindley Johnson, manager of NASA’s Near Earth Object program, which scans the heavens for dangerous objects, said the space agency is reassessing what size rocks to look for and how often they are likely to hit.

In addition, NASA this fall reactivated a dormant orbiting telescope called WISE specifically to hunt for asteroids, Johnson said. And the agency is expanding ground-based sky searches.

At the same time, NASA and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are looking into the need for evacuations in the case of an asteroid headed for Earth and how to keep the public informed without scaring people.

Those issues came up after the two agencies quietly held a disaster drill last spring in Washington that was meant to simulate what would happen if a space rock slightly bigger than the Chelyabinsk one threatened the East Coast.

During the drill, when it looked as if the meteor would hit just outside the nation’s capital, experts predicted 78,000 people could die. But when the mock meteor ended up in the ocean, the fake damage featured a 49-foot tsunami and shortages of supplies along the East Coast, according to an after-action report obtained by The Associated Press.

The exercise and the studies show there’s a risk from smaller space rocks that strike before they are detected — not just from the giant, long-seen-in-advance ones like in the movie “Armageddon,” said Bill Ailor, a space debris expert at the Aerospace Corporation who helped coordinate the drill.

“The biggest hazard from asteroids right now is the city-busting airbursts, not the civilization-busting impacts from 1-kilometer-diameter objects that has so far been the target of most astronomical surveys,” Purdue University astronomer Jay Melosh, who wasn’t part of the studies, wrote in an email.

“Old-fashioned civil defense, not Bruce Willis and his atom bombs, might be the best insurance against hazards of this kind.”

Chodas said the Chelyabinsk rock surprised astronomers because it was coming from the direction of the sun and was not detectable. Telescopes can see some space rocks as small as 3 feet wide, but some are simply too dark to spot, he said.

Scientists said a 1908 giant blast over Siberia, a 1963 airborne explosion off the coast of South Africa, and others were of the type that is supposed to happen less than once a century, or in the case of Siberia, once every 8,000 years, yet they all occurred in a 105-year timespan.

Because more than two-thirds of Earth is covered with water and other vast expanses are uninhabited deserts and ice, other past fireballs could have gone unnoticed.

Just this week, NASA got a wake-up call on those bigger space rocks that astronomers thought they had a handle on, discovering two 12-mile-wide asteroids and a 1.2-mile-wide one that had escaped their notice until this month. However, NASA said the three objects won’t hit Earth.

Asteroids are space rocks that circle the sun as leftovers of failed attempts to form planets billions of years ago. When asteroids enter Earth’s atmosphere, they become meteors. (When they hit the ground, they are called meteorites.)

The studies said the Chelyabinsk meteor probably split off from a much bigger space rock.

What happened in the Russian city of 1 million people is altering how astronomers look at a space rocks. With first-of-its-kind video, photos, satellite imagery and the broken-up rock, scientists have been able to piece together the best picture yet of what happens when an asteroid careens into Earth’s atmosphere. It’s not pretty.

“I certainly never expected to see something of this scale or this magnitude,” said University of Western Ontario physicist Peter Brown, lead author of one study. “It’s certainly scary.”

Scientists said the unusually shallow entry of the space rock spread out its powerful explosion, limiting its worst damage but making a wider area feel the effects. When it burst it released 500 kilotons of energy, scientists calculated.

“We were lucky. This could have easily gone the other way. It was really dangerous,” said NASA meteor astronomer Peter Jenniskens, co-author of one of the papers. “This was clearly extraordinary. Just stunning.”

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Online:

NASA’s Near Earth Object Program: http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature

The journal Science: http://www.sciencemag.org

___

Seth Borenstein can be followed at http://twitter.com/borenbears

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/b2f0ca3a594644ee9e50a8ec4ce2d6de/Article_2013-11-06-Asteroid%20Hit/id-87d81d46a8dc42a2acafcddce96b8a95
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